Integrating Faidherbia albida trees into a sorghum field reduces striga infestation and improves mycorrhiza spore density and colonization

Birhane, Emiru; Gebremeskel, Kidu; Taddesse, Tewodros; Hailemariam, Mengsteab; Hadgu, Kiros Meles; Norgrove, Lindsey; Negussie, Aklilu (2018). Integrating Faidherbia albida trees into a sorghum field reduces striga infestation and improves mycorrhiza spore density and colonization Agroforestry Systems, 92(3), pp. 643-653. Springer 10.1007/s10457-016-0027-8

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Integrating agroforestry trees such as Faidherbia albida (F. albida) into cropland improves soil fertility and maintains persistence of associated beneficial microorganisms such as Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF) that protects crops from striga colonization. Striga hermonthica (striga) is an obligate root hemi-parasitic weed of maize and sorghum, which stunts growth and causes low grain yield. Data on physico-chemical properties of the soil, yield components of sorghum, striga infestation and spore abundance and colonization of AM fungi were collected from underneath and away from the F. albida canopy. The experiment was composed of four treatments and six replications in a randomized complete block design (RCBD) with 24 plots, each with 15 m2 size. Soil and root samples were also collected from under and outside of the F. albida canopy and sorghum crops. Soil organic matter, total N, available P, CEC, and total K were significantly higher under the F. albida canopy than away from it (P < 0.05). Similarly, yield of sorghum was also significantly higher under the F. albida canopy than away from it (P < 0.05). The highest striga count was recorded away from the F. albida canopy. In contrast, minimal striga infestation was found under and at the periphery of the F. albida canopy. The spore density and colonization of AMF were higher under and at the periphery of the F. albida canopy than away from it (P < 0.05). There was a significant and negative correlation between AMF fungi spore density and colonization, and striga counts at the early stage of sorghum growth. Integrating F. albida into agricultural fields with sorghum crops improves productivity and maintains AM inoculum which may control striga weed infestation.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

School of Agricultural, Forest and Food Sciences HAFL > Resource-efficient agricultural production systems
School of Agricultural, Forest and Food Sciences HAFL > HAFL Hugo P. Cecchini Institute

Name:

Birhane, Emiru;
Gebremeskel, Kidu;
Taddesse, Tewodros;
Hailemariam, Mengsteab;
Hadgu, Kiros Meles;
Norgrove, Lindsey and
Negussie, Aklilu

Subjects:

S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)

ISSN:

0167-4366

Publisher:

Springer

Language:

English

Submitter:

David Zimmer

Date Deposited:

03 Sep 2019 11:07

Last Modified:

23 Sep 2020 08:51

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s10457-016-0027-8

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Striga hermonthica; Sorghum; Grain yield; Faidherbia albida; Arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi; Ethiopia

ARBOR DOI:

10.24451/arbor.8174

URI:

https://arbor.bfh.ch/id/eprint/8174

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