The High-end Bias - An irrational preference of decision makers for high-end over low-end innovations.

Reinhardt, Ronny; Gurtner, Sebastian; Hoskins, Jake D.; Griffin, Abbie (2017). The High-end Bias - An irrational preference of decision makers for high-end over low-end innovations. Academy of Management Proceedings, 2017(1), p. 13528. 10.5465/AMBPP.2017.195

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Managerial decision-making idiosyncrasies continue to be pressing issues for academia and practice. Building on implicit attitude and evolutionary psychology theory, we hypothesize that decision makers implicitly prefer high-end over low-end innovation projects and that these implicitly held attitudes affect investment decisions. We also argue that firms introduce more high-end than low-end products despite no clear, objective advantage for high-end products. Two experiments and secondary data from consumer packaged goods provide substantial evidence for these hypotheses and thus the existence of a high-end innovation bias. This research extends the existing literature showing that implicit attitudes not only cause discrimination against people but also against project ideas and products, which has negative effects for low-end consumers and firms.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

Business > Institute for Innovation and Strategic Entrepreneurship > Low-end Innovation
Business

Name:

Reinhardt, Ronny;
Gurtner, Sebastian;
Hoskins, Jake D. and
Griffin, Abbie

ISSN:

0065-0668

Language:

English

Submitter:

Admin import user

Date Deposited:

03 Sep 2019 12:53

Last Modified:

08 Sep 2019 01:31

Publisher DOI:

10.5465/AMBPP.2017.195

Related URLs:

Uncontrolled Keywords:

low-end innovation, cognitive bias, high-end innovation

URI:

https://arbor.bfh.ch/id/eprint/7785

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