Iodine: Biochemistry, Deficiency and Application in Clinical Nutrition.

Jenzer, Helena; Sadeghi-Reeves, Leila (2017). Iodine: Biochemistry, Deficiency and Application in Clinical Nutrition. The Canadian Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 5(1), pp. 1-9. Global Science Heritage 10.14206/canad.j.clin.nutr.2017.01.01

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Iodine is an essential trace element needed for normal metabolic functions. Although 70% of the body’s iodine is distributed in other tissues, the thyroid gland is the most relevant organ susceptible to iodine effect. In aqueous solution, due to the ability of keeping several oxidation states, the species I-, I2, OI-, HOI, IO3 -, H5IO6, and H3IO6 2- are likely to co-exist. Their steady state and reaction equilibrium depend on pH, temperature and solvent conditions. Suitable food sources rich in iodine are plants from iodine-rich soil, iodized salt, or seafood. The principal objectives of nutritional supply with iodine are to cover the needed daily intake and to stabilize basal metabolic rate. Keywords: Iodine Deficiency, Clinical Nutrition, Biochemistry, Stereochemistry

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

Department of Health Professions > Abteilung Ernährung und Diätetik
Department of Health Professions

Name:

Jenzer, Helena and Sadeghi-Reeves, Leila

ISSN:

1927-8942

Publisher:

Global Science Heritage

Language:

English

Submitter:

Admin import user

Date Deposited:

27 Jan 2020 15:42

Last Modified:

27 Jan 2020 15:42

Publisher DOI:

10.14206/canad.j.clin.nutr.2017.01.01

ARBOR DOI:

10.24451/arbor.6021

URI:

https://arbor.bfh.ch/id/eprint/6021

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