Orthotic correction of lower limb function during gait does not immediately influence spinal kinematics in spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy.

Schmid, Stefan; Romkes, Jacqueline; Taylor, William R.; Lorenzetti, Silvio; Brunner, Reinald (2016). Orthotic correction of lower limb function during gait does not immediately influence spinal kinematics in spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy. Gait Posture, 49, pp. 457-462. Elsevier 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2016.08.013

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Background and purpose Foot equinus and leg length discrepancy (LLD) are common problems in hemiplegic cerebral palsy (hCP), both causing secondary deviations of pelvic motion during gait. It can therefore be assumed that the spinal deviations observed in hCP patients are secondary as a compensation for the position of the pelvis arising from the disturbed leg function. This study investigated the effects of correcting lower extremity function by orthotics on spinal gait kinematics in hCP patients. Methods Ten adolescent hCP patients and 15 healthy controls were included. Using a validated and previously used enhanced marker set, sagittal and frontal plane spinal curvature angles as well as general trunk and lower extremity kinematics were measured while walking barefoot as well as with an orthotic correction (only hCP patients) using a 12-camera motion capture system. Results The hCP patients in both the barefoot and orthotic conditions indicated clinically relevant greater lumbar lordosis angles (d ≥ 0.96, p ≤ 0.071), smaller thoracic kyphosis angles (d ≥ 0.84, p ≤ 0.142) and differences in frontal plane lumbar curvature angles (d ≥ 1.00, p ≤ 0.105) compared to controls. However, these angles were not influenced by the successful restoration of a normal heel-to-toe gait pattern and the correction of any LLD using lower extremity orthotics. Conclusions Spinal gait deviations in adolescents with mild hCP seemed not to result secondarily from foot equinus or LLD, but probably from structural deformities such as hip flexor contractures. Future research should address long-term effects of an AFO treatment as well as the relationship between spinal kinematics and severity of disease.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

School of Health Professions
School of Health Professions > Physiotherapy
School of Health Professions > Physiotherapy > Spinal Movement Biomechanics

Name:

Schmid, Stefan0000-0001-5138-9800;
Romkes, Jacqueline;
Taylor, William R.;
Lorenzetti, Silvio and
Brunner, Reinald

ISSN:

0966-6362

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Admin import user

Date Deposited:

29 Oct 2019 11:26

Last Modified:

18 Dec 2020 13:27

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.gaitpost.2016.08.013

ARBOR DOI:

10.24451/arbor.6001

URI:

https://arbor.bfh.ch/id/eprint/6001

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