Pelvic floor muscle electromyography during different running speeds: an exploratory and reliability study.

Luginbühl, Helena; Näff, Rebecca; Zahnd, Anna; Baeyens, Jean-Pierre; Kuhn, Annette; Radlinger, Lorenz (2016). Pelvic floor muscle electromyography during different running speeds: an exploratory and reliability study. Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics, 293(1), pp. 117-124. Springer 10.1007/s00404-015-3816-9

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Purpose Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) affects women of all ages including young athletes, especially those involved in high-impact sports. To date, hardly any studies are available testing pelvic floor muscles (PFM) during sports activities. The aim of this study was the description and reliability test of six PFM electromyography (EMG) variables during three different running speeds. The secondary objective was to evaluate whether there was a speed-dependent difference between the PFM activity variables. Methods This trial was designed as an exploratory and reliability study including ten young healthy female subjects to characterize PFM pre-activity and reflex activity during running at 7, 9 and 11 km/h. Six variables for each running speed, averaged over ten steps per subject, were presented descriptively, tested regarding their reliability (Friedman, ICC, SEM, MD) and speed difference (Friedman). Results PFM EMG variables varied between 67.6 and 106.1 %EMG, showed no systematic error and were low for SEM and MD using the single value model. Applying the average model over ten steps, ICC (3,k) were >0.75 and SEM and MD about 50 % lower than for the single value model. Activity was found to be highest in 11 km/h. Conclusion EMG variables showed excellent ICC and very low SEM and MD. Further studies should investigate inter-session reliability and PFM reactivity patterns of SUI patients using the average over ten steps for each variable as it showed very high ICC and very low SEM and MD. Subsequently, longer running distances and other high-impact sports disciplines could be studied. Keywords Jogging Pelvic floor Reproducibility Sports Stress urinary incontinence

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

School of Health Professions

Name:

Luginbühl, Helena0000-0002-9865-7144;
Näff, Rebecca;
Zahnd, Anna;
Baeyens, Jean-Pierre;
Kuhn, Annette and
Radlinger, Lorenz0000-0002-0326-6264

ISSN:

0003-9128

Publisher:

Springer

Language:

English

Submitter:

Admin import user

Date Deposited:

26 Nov 2019 13:11

Last Modified:

18 Aug 2021 15:10

Publisher DOI:

10.1007/s00404-015-3816-9

ARBOR DOI:

10.24451/arbor.5869

URI:

https://arbor.bfh.ch/id/eprint/5869

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