Municipal composts reduce the transfer of Cd from soil to vegetables

Al Mamun, Shamim; Chanson, Guilhem; Muliadi, M; Benyas, Ebrahim; Aktar, Munmun; Lehto, Niklas; McDowell, Richard; Cavanagh, Jo; Kellermann, Liv Anna; Clucas, Lynne; Robinson, Brett (2016). Municipal composts reduce the transfer of Cd from soil to vegetables Environmental Pollution, 213, pp. 8-15. Elsevier 10.1016/j.envpol.2016.01.072

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Cadmium (Cd) is a non-essential trace element that accumulates in agricultural soils through theapplication of Cd-rich phosphate fertiliser. Vegetables can accumulate Cd to concentrations that some-times exceed food safety standards. We investigated the potential of low-cost soil amendments to reduceCd uptake by spinach (Spinacia oleraceaL.), lettuce (Lactuca sativaL.) and onion (Allium cepaL.). Batchsorption experiments revealed the relative sorption of Cd by biosolids, charcoal, lignite, sawdust, twotypes of compost, bentonite and zeolite. Lignite and compost had the greatest ability to sorb Cd and weresubsequently selected for pot trials, which elucidated their effect on Cd uptake by onions, spinach andlettuce in two market garden soils with native Cd concentrations of 1.45 mg/kg and 0.47 mg/kg. Theaddition of 2.5% (dry w/w) municipal compost reduced the Cd concentration in onions, spinach andlettuce by up to 60% in both soils. The addition of lignite gave variable results, which depended on thesoil type and rate of addition. This Cd immobilisation was offset by soil acidification caused by the lignite.The results indicate that municipal compost is a low-cost soil conditioner that is effective in reducingplant Cd uptake.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

School of Agricultural, Forest and Food Sciences HAFL
School of Agricultural, Forest and Food Sciences HAFL > Resource-efficient agricultural production systems
School of Agricultural, Forest and Food Sciences HAFL > Agriculture
School of Agricultural, Forest and Food Sciences HAFL > Agriculture > Soils and Geoinformation

Name:

Al Mamun, Shamim;
Chanson, Guilhem;
Muliadi, M;
Benyas, Ebrahim;
Aktar, Munmun;
Lehto, Niklas;
McDowell, Richard;
Cavanagh, Jo;
Kellermann, Liv Anna;
Clucas, Lynne and
Robinson, Brett

Subjects:

G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GE Environmental Sciences
Q Science > QD Chemistry
Q Science > QE Geology
Q Science > QK Botany
S Agriculture > S Agriculture (General)
S Agriculture > SB Plant culture

ISSN:

02697491

Publisher:

Elsevier

Language:

English

Submitter:

Liv Anna Kellermann

Date Deposited:

06 Nov 2020 09:24

Last Modified:

18 Jan 2021 14:02

Publisher DOI:

10.1016/j.envpol.2016.01.072

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Biowastes, Lignite, Soil amendments, Heavy metals, Trace elements

ARBOR DOI:

10.24451/arbor.12285

URI:

https://arbor.bfh.ch/id/eprint/12285

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