Same Performance Changes After Live High-Train Low in Normobaric vs. Hypobaric Hypoxia

Saugy, Jonas J.; Schmitt, Laurent; Hauser, Anna; Constantin, Guillaume; Cejuela-Anta, Roberto; Faiss, Raphael; Wehrlin, Jon Peter; Rosset, Jérémie; Robinson, Neil; Millet, Grégoire P. (2016). Same Performance Changes After Live High-Train Low in Normobaric vs. Hypobaric Hypoxia Frontiers in Physiology, 7, p. 138. Frontiers 10.3389/fphys.2016.00138

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Purpose: We investigated the changes in physiological and performance parameters after a Live High-Train Low (LHTL) altitude camp in normobaric (NH) or hypobaric hypoxia (HH) to reproduce the actual training practices of endurance athletes using a crossover-designed study. Methods: Well-trained triathletes (n = 16) were split into two groups and completed two 18-day LTHL camps during which they trained at 1100-1200 m and lived at 2250 m (P i O2 = 111.9 ± 0.6 vs. 111.6 ± 0.6 mmHg) under NH (hypoxic chamber; FiO2 18.05 ± 0.03%) or HH (real altitude; barometric pressure 580.2 ± 2.9 mmHg) conditions. The subjects completed the NH and HH camps with a 1-year washout period. Measurements and protocol were identical for both phases of the crossover study. Oxygen saturation (S p O2) was constantly recorded nightly. P i O2 and training loads were matched daily. Blood samples and VO2max were measured before (Pre-) and 1 day after (Post-1) LHTL. A 3-km running-test was performed near sea level before and 1, 7, and 21 days after training camps. Results: Total hypoxic exposure was lower for NH than for HH during LHTL (230 vs. 310 h; P < 0.001). Nocturnal S p O2 was higher in NH than in HH (92.4 ± 1.2 vs. 91.3 ± 1.0%, P < 0.001). VO2max increased to the same extent for NH and HH (4.9 ± 5.6 vs. 3.2 ± 5.1%). No difference was found in hematological parameters. The 3-km run time was significantly faster in both conditions 21 days after LHTL (4.5 ± 5.0 vs. 6.2 ± 6.4% for NH and HH), and no difference between conditions was found at any time. Conclusion: Increases in VO2max and performance enhancement were similar between NH and HH conditions.

Item Type:

Journal Article (Original Article)

Division/Institute:

Swiss Federal Institute of Sports Magglingen SFISM > EHSM - Leistungssport > Sportphysiologie Ausdauer

Name:

Saugy, Jonas J.;
Schmitt, Laurent;
Hauser, Anna;
Constantin, Guillaume;
Cejuela-Anta, Roberto;
Faiss, Raphael;
Wehrlin, Jon Peter;
Rosset, Jérémie;
Robinson, Neil and
Millet, Grégoire P.

ISSN:

1664-042X

Publisher:

Frontiers

Language:

English

Submitter:

Admin import user

Date Deposited:

24 Feb 2021 12:28

Last Modified:

02 Oct 2021 02:18

Publisher DOI:

10.3389/fphys.2016.00138

PubMed ID:

27148076

Uncontrolled Keywords:

Aerobic exercise Altitude-training camp Crossover study Real altitude Simulated altitude

ARBOR DOI:

10.24451/arbor.10940

URI:

https://arbor.bfh.ch/id/eprint/10940

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